Callimedusa tomopterna (Cope, 1868)

Class: Amphibia > Order: Anura > Family: Phyllomedusidae > Genus: Callimedusa > Species: Callimedusa tomopterna

Pithecopus tomopternus Cope, 1868, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 20: 112. Syntypes: Smithsonian Museum (USNM) 6651 (2 specimens), now lost, according to Duellman, 1977, Das Tierreich, 95: 164. Type locality: "Río Napo, or Upper Amazon, below the mouth of the former", Departamento Loreto, Peru.

Phyllomedusa tomopternaBoulenger, 1882, Cat. Batr. Sal. Coll. Brit. Mus., Ed. 2: 430; Funkhouser, 1957, Occas. Pap. Nat. Hist. Mus. Stanford Univ., 5: 25.

Phyllomedusa (Pithecopus) tomopternaLutz, 1950, Mem. Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, 48: 603.

Pithecopus tomopternaLutz, 1950, Mem. Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, 48: 603, 619; Lutz, 1966, Copeia, 1966: 236.

Callimedusa tomopterna — Duellman, Marion, and Hedges, 2016, Zootaxa, 4104: 33. 

English Names

Tiger-striped Leaf Frog (Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 62).

Tiger-striped Monkey Frog (Villacampa-Ortega, Serrano-Rojas, and Whitworth, 2017, Amph. Manu Learning Cent.: 188).

Distribution

Upper Amazon Basin in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia; and Guianan region from southeastern Venezuela to French Guiana; Brazilian Amazonia.

Comment

See account by Duellman, 1974, Herpetologica, 30: 105–114. Duellman, 1978, Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ. Kansas, 65: 179–180, provided a brief account including characterization of call and tadpole. Zimmerman, 1983, Herpetologica, 39: 235–246, and Zimmerman and Bogart, 1984, Acta Amazonica, 14: 473–520, reported on vocalization. Rodríguez and Duellman, 1994, Univ. Kansas Mus. Nat. Hist. Spec. Publ., 22: 46, provided a brief account for the Iquitos region of northeastern Peru as Phyllomedusa tomopternaLescure and Marty, 2000, Collect. Patrimoines Nat., Paris, 45: 104–105, provided a brief account and photo. Barrio-Amorós, 1999 "1998", Acta Biol. Venezuelica, 18: 40, commented on the Venezuelan localities. Duellman, 2005, Cusco Amazonico: 256–258, provided an account (adult and larval morphology, description of the call, life history). Not assigned to species group by Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005, Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., 294: 117–118. Fouquet, Gilles, Vences, Marty, Blanc, and Gemmell, 2007, PLoS One, 10 (e1109): 1–10, provided molecular evidence that this is a species complex. See account for Suriname population by Ouboter and Jairam, 2012, Amph. Suriname: 210–211. Barrio-Amorós, 2009, Mem. Fund. La Salle Cienc. Nat., 171: 19–46, reported on the biology and range in Venezuela. Ron, Almendáriz C., and Cannatella, 2013, Zootaxa, 3741: 289–294, moved the species into the Phyllomedusa perinosus group on the basis of molecular evidence. See Barrio-Amorós, Rojas-Runjaic, and Señaris, 2019, Amph. Rept. Conserv., 13 (1: e180): 105–106, for comments on range, extinction at the type locality, and literature, noting that this name probably covers a species complex. For identification of larvae (as Phyllomedusa tomopternaƒ) in central Amazonia, Brazil, see Hero, 1990, Amazoniana, 11: 201–262. See brief account for the Manu region, Peru, by Villacampa-Ortega, Serrano-Rojas, and Whitworth, 2017, Amph. Manu Learning Cent.: 188–189.

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