Fejervarya cancrivora (Gravenhorst, 1829)

Class: Amphibia > Order: Anura > Family: Dicroglossidae > Subfamily: Dicroglossinae > Genus: Fejervarya > Species: Fejervarya cancrivora

Rana cancrivora Gravenhorst, 1829, Delic. Mus. Zool. Vratislav., 1: 41. Type(s): Not stated although presumably originally in Breslau Museum (now MNHHWU?); Dubois and Ohler, 2000, Alytes, 18: 30, noted that the types were lost and designated FMNH 256688 as neotype. Type locality: "Java", Indonesia. Neotype from "Cianjur (06° 49′ S, 107° 08′ E), West Java, Java (Indonesia)".

Rana tigrina var. angustopalmata Van Kampen, 1907, Zool. Ergebn. Reis. Niederland. Ost-Indien, 4: 388. Syntypes: ZMA 5729-31 (Waingapu, Sumba, Indonesia), 5754-46 (Saleyer, Indonesia), 5744 (Makassar, Celebes, Indonesia), 5732 (Tempe, Celebes, Indonesia), 5733-37 (Lapalupa River near Tempe, Celebes, Indonesia), 5738 Pampanua, Celebes, Indonesia), 5739-40 (Katjang, Celebes, Indonesia), 5741 (Maros, Celebes, Indoesia), 5742-43 (Pare-pare, Celebes, Indonesia, other syntypes in E.H. Taylor collection (now in FMNH if still extant), according to Van Tuijl, 1995, Bull. Zool. Mus. Univ. Amsterdam, 14: 129. Type localities: "Sumba: Fluss bei Waingapu", "Celebes: Tempe . . . ; Fluss La-Palupa bei Tempe . . . ; Pampanua . . . ; Katjang . . . ; Maros . . . ; Pare-Pare . . . ; Makassar . . .", Indonesia; restricted to Ost-sumba, Fluss bei Waingapu by Mertens, 1930, Abh. Senckenb. Naturforsch. Ges., 42: 214. Synonymy by Boulenger, 1920, Rec. Indian Mus., 20: 16.

Rana tigerina angustopalmataBarbour, 1912, Mem. Mus. Comp. Zool., 44: 64.

Rana tigrina var. cancrivoraBoulenger, 1918, Rec. Indian Mus., 15: 58.

Rana cancrivoraAnnandale, 1918, Rec. Indian Mus., 15: 63.

Rana (Rana) crancrivoraBoulenger, 1920, Rec. Indian Mus., 20: 6. Van Kampen, 1923, Amph. Indo-Austral. Arch.: 170.

Rana cancrivora cancrivoraDunn, 1928, Am. Mus. Novit., 315: 5.

Rana cancrivora raja Smith, 1930, Bull. Raffles Mus., 3: 96-97. Type(s): M. Smith collection 7395 and 7442 (now presumably in the BMNH or RM). Type locality: "neighbourhood of Pattani town", Pattani, Thailand. Synonymy (with Fejervarya cancrivora sensu stricto) by Kurniawan, Islam, Djong, Igawa, Belabut, Yong, Wanichanon, Khan, Iskandar, Nishioka, and Sumida, 2010, Zool. Sci., Tokyo, 27: 231; Yodthong, Stuart, and Aowphol, 2019, ZooKeys, 883: 119. 

Dicroglossus cancrivorusDeckert, 1938, Sitzungsber. Ges. Naturforsch. Freunde Berlin, 1938: 138.

Rana rajaTaylor, 1962, Univ. Kansas Sci. Bull., 43: 373.

Rana (Euphlyctis) cancrivoraDubois, 1981, Monit. Zool. Ital., N.S., Suppl., 15: 239, by implication.

Euphlyctis cancrivoraPoynton and Broadley, 1985, Ann. Natal Mus., 27: 124, by implication; Fei, Ye, and Huang, 1990, Key to Chinese Amph.: 144.

Limnonectes (Hoplobatrachus) cancrivorusDubois, 1987 "1986", Alytes, 5: 60.

Limnonectes (Hoplobatrachus) rajaDubois, 1987 "1986", Alytes, 5: 60.

Limnonectes (Fejervarya) rajaDubois, 1992, Bull. Mens. Soc. Linn. Lyon, 61: 315.

Limnonectes (Fejervarya) cancrivorusDubois, 1992, Bull. Mens. Soc. Linn. Lyon, 61: 315.

Fejervarya rajaIskandar, 1998, Amph. Java Bali: 71, by implication; Dubois and Ohler, 2000, Alytes, 18: 35; Fei, Ye, Jiang, and Xie, 2002, Herpetol. Sinica, 9: 93.

Fejervarya cancrivoraIskandar, 1998, Amph. Java Bali: 71; Fei, 1999, Atlas Amph. China: 182; Dubois and Ohler, 2000, Alytes, 18: 35; Fei, Ye, Jiang, and Xie, 2002, Herpetol. Sinica, 9: 93.

English Names

Java Wart Frog (Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 99).

Javan Wart Frog (Nguyen, Ho, and Nguyen, 2005, Checklist Amph. Rept. Vietnam: 21).

Mangrove Frog (Ananjeva, Borkin, Darevsky, and Orlov, 1988, Dict. Amph. Rept. Five Languages: 121; Das, 2007, Amph. Rept. Brunei: 45; Grismer, 2012, Field Guide Amph. Rept. Seribuat Arch.: 65).

Marsh Frog (Iskandar, 1998, Amph. Java Bali: 71).

Rice Field Frog (Iskandar, 1998, Amph. Java Bali: 71).

Crab-eating Frog (Lim and Lim, 1992, Guide Amph. Rept. Singapore: 28; Iskandar, 1998, Amph. Java Bali: 71).

Marsh Frog (Lim and Lim, 1992, Guide Amph. Rept. Singapore: 28).

Brackish Water Frog (Gaulke, 2011, Herpetofauna Panay Island: 76).

Pattani Wart Frog (Fejervarya raja [no longer recognized]: Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 100).

Southern Field Frog ((Fejervarya raja [no longer recognized]: Nutphund, 2001, Amph. Thailand: 134).

Rajah Frog ((Fejervarya raja [no longer recognized]: Chan-ard, 2003, Photograph. Guide Amph. Thailand: 110).

Gulf Coast Frog (Fejervarya cancrivoraFei, Ye, and Jiang, 2012, Colored Atlas Chinese Amph. Distr.: 438). 

Crab-eating Grassfrog (Zug and Mulcahy, 2020 "2019", Amph. Rept. S. Tanintharyi: 32). 

Distribution

Isthmus of Kra in Thailand, West Malaysia, Kalimantan (Borneo), Sumatra, West and Central Java, and Bali in Indonesia, with introduced populations in Papua New Guinea and Guam; populations from Komodo I. and Flores I., and the and the introduced populations in Papua New Guinea, and Guam require confirmation and may refer to Fejervarya moodiei or unnamed species. 

Comment

See Boulenger, 1920, Rec. Indian Mus., 20: 23; Inger, 1954, Fieldiana, Zool., 33: 260–267, Taylor, 1962, Univ. Kansas Sci. Bull., 43: 377–379; and Inger, 1966, Fieldiana, Zool., 52: 175–176, for synonymy and accounts, bearing in mind that these accounts reflect a broader taxonomic concept than presently embraced. See also Berry, 1975, Amph. Fauna Peninsular Malaysia: 62–63, and Lim and Lim, 1992, Guide Amph. Rept. Singapore: 28–29, for brief accounts. Nishioka and Sumida, 1990, Sci. Rep. Lab. Amph. Biol. Hiroshima Univ., 10: 125–154, discussed allozyme variation (in the sense of including Fejervarya moodiei). See identification table by Manthey and Grossmann, 1997, Amph. Rept. Südostasiens: 84–86, to compare the ranids and dicroglossids of the Sunda Shelf region. Dubois, 1987 "1986", Alytes, 5: 60, placed this in his Limnonectes (Hoplobatrachus) tigerinus group, but subsequently (Dubois, 1992, Bull. Mens. Soc. Linn. Lyon, 61: 315) moved it into Hoplobatrachus. Lever, 2003, Naturalized Rept. Amph. World: 201, reported on introduced populations in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea, although the taxonomic status of these frogs is currently unconfirmed. Dutta, 1997, Amph. India Sri Lanka: 127, provided range (Andaman and Nicobar Is.), systematic comments, and a taxonomic bibliography. McKay, 2006, Field Guide Amph. Rept. Bali: 36–37, provided a brief account of the Nicobar and Andaman Islands and a photograph. Menzies, 2006, Frogs New Guinea & Solomon Is.: 65–66, provided a brief account for New Guinea, although the taxonomic status of these frogs is currently unconfirmed. Das, 2007, Amph. Rept. Brunei: 45, provided a photograph and a brief account. Christy, Clark, Gee, Vice, Vice, Warner, Tyrrell, Rodda, and Savidge, 2007, Pacific Sci., 61: 469–483, reported specimens from Guam but could not determine whether the species was established. See Taylor, 1962, Univ. Kansas Sci. Bull., 43: 373–376, for discussion (as Rana raja). See identification table by Manthey and Grossmann, 1997, Amph. Rept. Südostasiens: 84–86, to compare this species (as Rana raja) with other ranids of the Sunda Shelf region (Fejervarya cancrivora in the sense of including Fejervarya moodiei). Dubois, 1987 "1986", Alytes, 5: 60, placed this species (as Limnonectes raja) in his Limnonectes (Hoplobatrachus) tigerinus group, but subsequently (Dubois, 1992, Bull. Mens. Soc. Linn. Lyon, 61: 315) moved it into Fejervarya. Chan-ard, 2003, Photograph. Guide Amph. Thailand: 110–111, provided a very brief account (as Fejervarya raja), map for Thailand, and photograph. Das and Dutta, 2007, Hamadryad, 31: 154–181, noted several larval descriptions of varying levels of completeness in the literature (Fejervarya cancrivora including what is now Fejervarya moodiei). Kurniawan, Islam, Djong, Igawa, Belabut, Yong, Wanichanon, Khan, Iskandar, Nishioka, and Sumida, 2010, Zool. Sci., Tokyo, 27: 222–233, reported on geographic variation in allozymes and mtRNA that suggested that this is minimally composed of three species, one of which is these is now named as Fejervarya moodiei and the third, in Sulawesi and Java may have the name Rana angustopalmata available, although this remains unconfirmed. In addition they suggested that Fejervarya raja is a junior synonym of Fejervarya cancrivora sensu stricto. Wanger, Motzke, Saleh, and Iskandar, 2011, Salamandra, 47: 17–29, reported the species from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, although this population is now regarded as an unnamed allied species. Hasan, Islam, Khan, Alam, Kurabayashi, Igawa, Kuramoto, and Sumida, 2012, Zool. Sci., Tokyo, 29: 162–172, using molecular techniques reported on a genetic tree that suggests considerable numbers of cryptic species within this nominal taxon. See brief account by Grismer, 2012, Field Guide Amph. Rept. Seribuat Arch.: 65–66, for the Seribuat Archipelago, West Malaysia.Shahriza and Ibrahim, 2014, Check List, 10: 253–259, provided a photograph and brief natural history observations for a population in Kedah, West Malaysia. Zug, 2013, Rept. Amph. Pacific Is.: 62–63, provided a brief account and photograph for the Guam population although the identity of this population remains unconfirmed.  Harikrishnan and Vasudevan, 2018, Alytes, 36: 249–251, commented on the distribution and natural history in the Andaman Islands, India, as Fejervarya cf. cancrivora.  Somaweera, Azis, Resa, Panggur, Saverinus, and Muga, 2018, Amph. Rept. Komodo Natl. Park: 7, provided a brief characterization and photograph for the associated population on Komodo, Indonesia. Reported for Pulau Langkawi, Kadeh, northwestern West Malaysia, by Grismer, Youmans, Wood, Ponce, Wright, Jones, Johnson, Sanders, Gower, Yaakob, and Lim, 2006, Hamadryad, 30: 61–74. Zug and Mulcahy, 2020 "2019", Amph. Rept. S. Tanintharyi: 32–33, provided a brief account for South Tanintharyi, peninsular Myanmar, which they considered likely to occur there.   

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