Centrolene lynchi (Duellman, 1980)

Class: Amphibia > Order: Anura > Family: Centrolenidae > Subfamily: Centroleninae > Genus: Centrolene > Species: Centrolene lynchi

Centrolenella lynchi Duellman, 1980, Trans. Kansas Acad. Sci., 83: 29. Holotype: KU 164691, by original designation. Type locality: "a stream 4 km northeast (by road) of Dos Ríos, Provincia Pichincha, Ecuador, 1140 m (00° 21′ S, 78° 54′ W)".

Centrolenella gemmata Flores, 1985, J. Herpetol., 19: 313. Holotype: MCZ 104073, by original designation. Type locality: "San Francisco de las Pampas, 1500 m in elevation, Provincia Cotopaxi, Ecuador (00° 25′ S, 78° 57′ W, just NW of junction of Rio Las Juritas and Rio Toachi)". Synonymy by Guayasamin, Cisneros-Heredia, McDiarmid, Peña, and Hutter, 2020, Diversity, 12 (222): 50. 

Centrolenella scirtetes Duellman and Burrowes, 1989, Occas. Pap. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ. Kansas, 132: 6. Holotype: KU 202720, by original designation. Type locality: "1.4 km (by road) southwest of Tandayapa (00° 07′ S, 78° 40′ W), 1820 m, Provincia de Pichincha, Ecuador". Synonymy by Guayasamin, Cisneros-Heredia, McDiarmid, Peña, and Hutter, 2020, Diversity, 12 (222): 50. 

Centrolene scirtetes — Ruiz-Carranza and Lynch, 1991, Lozania, 57: 20.

Centrolene gemmatum — Ruiz-Carranza and Lynch, 1991, Lozania, 57: 19.

Centrolene lynchiRuiz-Carranza and Lynch, 1991, Lozania, 57: 20.

Centrolene gemmata — Barrio-Amorós, Rojas-Runjaic, and Señaris, 2019, Amph. Rept. Conserv., 13 (1: e180): 19. 

English Names

Lynch's Giant Glass Frog (Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 46).

Lynch's Glassfrog (Arteaga-Navarro, Bustamante, and Guayasamin, 2013, Amph. Rept. Mindo: 42). 

Pampas Giant Glass Frog (Centrolene gemmata [no longer recognized]: Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 46).

Tandayapa Giant Glass Frog (Centrolene scirtetes [no longer recognized]: Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 46).

Distribution

Elevations of 1520–1858 m on the Pacific slopes of the western Andes in Colombia and Ecuador; in Colombia, the species has been reported in only one locality (Reserva La Planada, 7 km route of Chucunés, 1780 m, Departamento de Nariño); in Ecuador from seven localities (provinces of Cotopaxi, Pichincha, and Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas).  

Comment

See comment under Centrolenella grandisonae. In the Centrolene peristictum group according to Ruiz-Carranza and Lynch, 1991, Lozania, 57: 1-30. Cisneros-Heredia and McDiarmid, 2007, Zootaxa, 1572: 54, discussed the species in Ecuador and provided access to the relevant literature. See comments under Centrolene peristictum, Centrolene scirtetes, and Centrolene gemmatum. See photograph, map, description of geographic range and habitat, and conservation status in Stuart, Hoffmann, Chanson, Cox, Berridge, Ramani, and Young, 2008, Threatened Amph. World: 210. Catenazzi, von May, Gagliardi-Urrutia, Lehr, and Guayasamin, 2012, Zootaxa, 3388: 64, confirmed the placement of this species in CentroleneArteaga-Navarro, Bustamante, and Guayasamin, 2013, Amph. Rept. Mindo: 42–43, provided an account and map for Ecuador and noted the possibility that Centrolene scirtetes might be conspecific.  Cisneros-Heredia and Yánez-Muñoz, 2007, S. Am. J. Herpetol., 2: 6, and Cisneros-Heredia and McDiarmid, 2007, Zootaxa, 1572: 52, suggested that Centrolene gemmatum is conspecific with Centrolene lynchi but did not make the formal change pending publication on this topic elsewhere. See photograph, map, description of geographic range and habitat, and conservation status for nominal Centrolene gemmata in Stuart, Hoffmann, Chanson, Cox, Berridge, Ramani, and Young, 2008, Threatened Amph. World: 209. Guayasamin, Cisneros-Heredia, McDiarmid, Peña, and Hutter, 2020, Diversity, 12 (222): 50–55, provided a detailed account, including adult morphology, advertisement call, relationships, natural history, and conservation status.

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