Ctenophryne geayi Mocquard, 1904

Class: Amphibia > Order: Anura > Family: Microhylidae > Subfamily: Gastrophryninae > Genus: Ctenophryne > Species: Ctenophryne geayi

Ctenophryne geayi Mocquard, 1904, Bull. Mus. Natl. Hist. Nat. Paris, 10: 308. Type(s): Not stated; MNHNP 1903.84 registered as holotype according to Guibé, 1950 "1948", Cat. Types Amph. Mus. Natl. Hist. Nat.: 59. Type locality: "la rivière Sarare en Colombie" (=Sarare River, Norte de Santander, Colombia).

Ctenophryne geagiNieden, 1926, Das Tierreich, 49: 69. Incorrect subsequent spelling.

English Names

Brown Egg Frog (Frank and Ramus, 1995, Compl. Guide Scient. Common Names Amph. Rept. World: 89).

Distribution

Northern South America from Suriname, Guyana, and Brazil, Amazonian Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil although this latter requires confirmation.

Comment

Zweifel and Myers, 1989, Am. Mus. Novit., 2947: 1-16, have posited that the name Ctenophryne geayi actually represent two species (northern and southern populations). Duellman, 1978, Misc. Publ. Mus. Nat. Hist. Univ. Kansas, 65: 190–191, provided a brief account including characterization of call. Rodríguez and Duellman, 1994, Univ. Kansas Mus. Nat. Hist. Spec. Publ., 22: 75–76, provided a brief account for the Iquitos region of northeastern Peru. Duellman, 1997, Sci. Pap. Nat. Hist. Mus. Univ. Kansas, 2: 29–30, commented on the natural history of the southeastern Venezuela population. De la Riva, Köhler, Lötters, and Reichle, 2000, Rev. Esp. Herpetol., 14: 58, and Köhler, 2000, Bonn. Zool. Monogr., 48: 69, consider this species possibly to occur in Bolivia. Lescure and Marty, 2000, Collect. Patrimoines Nat., Paris, 45: 270-271, provided a photo and brief account for French Guiana. Barrio-Amorós, 1999 "1998", Acta Biol. Venezuelica, 18: 56-57, commented on the Venezuelan distribution. Zimmerman and Rodrigues, 1990, in Gentry (ed.), Four Neotropical Rainforests: 426-454, provided the first central Brazilan Amazonia record for this species, near Manaus. França and Venâncio, 2010, Biotemas, 23: 71–84, provided a record for the municipality of Boca do Acre, Amazonas, with a brief discussion of the range. Duellman, 2005, Cusco Amazonico: 297–299, provided an account (adult and larval morphology, description of the call, life history). See account for Suriname population by Ouboter and Jairam, 2012, Amph. Suriname: 276-277. Freitas, Dias, Farias, Oliveira e Sousa, Vieira, Moura, and Uhlig, 2014, Check List, 10: 585–587, provided a record for the state of Maranhao, Brazil, and discussed the range. Gonzales-Álvarez and Reichle, 2004, Rev. Boliviana Ecol. Conserv. Ambiental, 15: 93–96, provided a record for Chivé, Bolivia. See Barrio-Amorós, Rojas-Runjaic, and Señaris, 2019, Amph. Rept. Conserv., 13 (1: e180): 102, for comments on range and literature. For identification of larvae in central Amazonia, Brazil, see Hero, 1990, Amazoniana, 11: 201–262. See brief account for the Manu region, Peru, by Villacampa-Ortega, Serrano-Rojas, and Whitworth, 2017, Amph. Manu Learning Cent.: 248–249. Metcalf, Marsh, Torres Pacaya, Graham, and Gunnels, 2020, Herpetol. Notes, 13: 753–767, reported the species from the Santa Cruz Forest Reserve, Loreto, northeastern Peru. Tavares-Pinheiro, Figueiredo, and Costa-Campos, 2021, Herpetol. Notes, 14: 883–886, provided a dot map for the species and a record from southern Amapá, Brazil. Taucce, Costa-Campos, Carvalho, and Michalski, 2022, Eur. J. Taxon., 836: 96–130, reported on distribution, literature, and conservation status for Amapá, Brazil. 

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